A Glance at Millennium Blades…

Base Game Review

Player/s: 2-5

Play Time (Box): 2hours

Play Time (Goof): 90mins – 180mins

Producer/s: Level 99 Games

Designer/s: D. Brad Talton Jr

I know what you’re thinking – “but Goof, it’s Sunday. Aren’t you supposed to post a full review or a Goof’s guide or something?”

And yeah. You’re right. But here’s the thing:

I was up until 5am playing Millennium Blades.

So there’s no way I can do justice to a review today. As it is I’m trying my hardest not to fall asleep at my computer here.

So today we’re taking a one eye pried open glance at Millennium Blades.

All the cards in Millennium Blades. There’s so many!

 

The Good

Don’t let my tiredness mislead you. Millennium Blades is high intensity.

Says so right on the box

In the last six days, I’ve played exactly 11 hours and 22 minutes of Millennium Blades. And honestly I’d probably be having a game now if I wasn’t writing about it.

For those of you who don’t know what Millennium Blades is, it’s a board game ABOUT a Collectable Card Game. I realise this sounds a little confusing so I’ll give you a two-second run down.

There’s no real world randomised booster packs. In Millennium Blades you’ve got two main phases. A Deckbuilding Phase and a Tournament Phase. Deckbuilding is broken up into three real time periods of 7minutes, 7minutes, and 6 minutes. During this time you’ll be buying “booster packs” (single cards from various sets which could be useful), selling off cards you don’t need, trading cards, adding cards to various collections (you can score one a turn), fusing cards to turn them into cool promos, and preparing for the upcoming Tournament. This part of the game is full of high intensity moments of hurling satisfyingly weighted wads of money around, with a mixture of excitement and joy at new cards.

The Tournament Phase takes up probably about a third of the actual gameplay. The rest of the time, you’re tableau building, trying to put six of your eight cards in a system which scores you the most points using variable combos and interactions on the cards, all the while trying to outplay your opponents’ strategies.

The amount of cards in Millennium Blades is absolutely staggering. I reckon I’ve done more exercise lifting that box on and off my shelf than some people do at the gym (which is my excuse for not going). The game has 500+ cards with so many unique and interesting combinations and uses. Not to mention each card has parodies and references to all kinds of real world shows and pop culture. In playing the game as much as I have this week, I still haven’t seen everything. And because there’s so much information flying by and you rush to complete your various tasks, I’ve probably remembered about half of what I’ve looked at.

Can you tell which characters these are supposed to be? Answer in the comments!

 

The Bad

Even looking at Millennium Blades is daunting. One of the biggest issues I’m having is convincing players more towards the “casual” spectrum of gaming (and I want to emphasise there’s nothing wrong with casual gamers. They increase the amount of money being spent on board games so we can have such an amazing market of games available) to even sit at the table and give it a try. Hell, even Charlotte is giving the game uncomfortable sideways glances. I mean the game is a mammoth. And when you try to explain it to someone you sort of revert back to an eight year old telling his grandparents about this cool new Pokemon card he got while they look at you with a mixture of pity and boredom. Sigh. My Shiny Charizard was so cool…

 

Conclusion

Millennium Blades is a clever and unique beast. I’ve never played anything like it before and doubt anything like it will come along again anytime soon. This thing is a beast! And it deserves every ounce of praise it gets for being unique and trying something new. It’s got me checking out other Level99 Games.

I might go have a nap, and then play some more Millennium Blades.

I got my copy through Tabletop Wonderland

Tabletop Wonderland are offering readers of The Goof Review a 10% discount off of your first month to their subscription service! Just use the code GOOFREVIEW10

Have a game you’d like TGR to glance at? Let us know in the comments!

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